09 January 2010

The green fairy.

Last night we made a spur-of-the-moment trip up to the Roadhouse with Lisa and Brad. It was Friday, so I decided to celebrate with a little adult beverage. And you can bet that when my eye spotted "Absinthe Frappe" on the drink menu, I was sure to try it. I wanted some guidance, though, and asked the server a little about it. Listed on the menu for the drink was "absinthe, benedictine, and ice." Well, absinthe on ice is still just absinthe. So I wanted to know about this benedictine business. I ask the server what it is. His response? "Some kind of liquor." Uh, yeah, you think? Ha! So he went to find out and returned with a little shot of what was basically a super sweet brandy. I was sold. And along came my bright green absinthe frappe.

I ended up being pleasantly surprised. They managed to keep the flavor of the absinthe but kill the fire burn a little. When curiosity got the best of her, Lisa took a sip, made a yuck face, and pretty accurately described it as "the most concentrated Good 'n Plenty I've ever tasted." It took a lot of the ice chips melting to be able to take more than just mini sips, but I did finish it (even if it did take me throughout the entire meal). Will I order it again? Probably not. But it was super fun for the moment.

...Meanwhile, I ordered the pimento mac and cheese that Sara and I shared a few months ago, and it was even better than I remembered. The plain jane Roadhouse mac is still pretty tasty, but I tire of it after a few bites. The pimento cheese has a smoother, milder cheese flavor and I just love it to death. I ate every last noodle. And am craving it again right now. In fact, now that I have my big ole food processor now, I might have to whip up some of my own pimento cheese soon. Yum.

2 comments:

Sara said...

Oh, pimento mac n' cheese! Yummers!

Jennifer said...

That's a good looking absinthe frappe! I made one recently but never thought about adding benedictine... Must try again. (Practise makes perfect, of course.) Wonder what absinthe they used-- can make all the difference on how "Good n' Plenty" it tastes.
Cheers!